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Thanks, it was really enjoyable to discover how easy it was listening to Bokmål for the first tme with little need to turn on the subtitles. Presumably the Voss and/or Sauda folk can understand written and spoken Bokmål ?

I think there are probably similar parallels to dialects in the more northern parts of Scotland and the Isles as well which only the locals can distinguish, so it would be interesting to compare the above two geographical regions at some stage.

 

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Celtic Mists skrev (57 minutter siden):

I think there are probably similar parallels to dialects in the more northern parts of Scotland and the Isles

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:Scots_terms_derived_from_Old_Norse

You're welcome! Even "kilt" is said to come from the verb "kjalta", which means to fold. (I've never heard the verb "kjalta" in use.) Very interesting to see a list of the geographical names of Shetland, it was very informative. 

The Western folk will know bokmål, as they have listened to TV and radio. It's very rare to find someone who never listened to TV or radio. 

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Hi again

I'm trying to find somewhere where Bokmål is spoken all the time as the daily news on NRK is a bit too fast and not long enough. Ideally where someone is narrating from a book with English sub titles to really get used to it so some light fiction novel or similar would be ideal.

Thanks ?

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Celtic Mists skrev (1 time siden):

some light fiction novel or similar would be ideal.

Will try to think of something... meanwhile, the youtube channel Dplay Norge, has a few popular tv programs, with English subs. Like Ylvis, Skavlan, Markus and Martinus. Like this eccentric artist... only to turn on the subtitles.

 

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Thank you for the links. Funny thing I've been watching Swedish TV for a good 5 or 6 years now and often saw Skavlan's programmes but never realised he was speaking Norwegian as it was unintelligible till this programme. I can just about follow what he says now so assume he's speaking a regional dialect, whereas Nerdrum soon became easier so assume he's speaking Båkmål ? Most interesting of all was to hear the lady in the red dress speaking Swedish which was great to listen to, both languages being immediately understood by all so it will be very useful indeed over the long term. ?

 

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Celtic Mists skrev (2 timer siden):

I can just about follow what he says now so assume he's speaking a regional dialect, whereas Nerdrum soon became easier so assume he's speaking Båkmål ?

You're welcome, once more.

They come from the same region, but Nerdrum speaks in a more oldish way. In programs for Swedish TV, Skavlan tries to speak in a Swedish way (svorsk = svensk-norsk)!

Not easy to find movies to link to, with English subs. This documentary, is both in English and Norwegian: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6AyaB3ua124 (about areas with many descendants of Norwegian immigrants).

The Ylvis brothers speak mostly Bokmål, but with the tone and the R's from Bergen. For more, you can probably order Norwegian books and buy the English too, and let them explain each other. The books of Roald Dahl are often used in schools, but surely there must be other possibilities too. Or buy DVDs from Scandinavia, and watch them with Norwegian subtitles. 

This is a remarkable silent movie with English posters, but of course you can't hear anyone speak: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1OqGjLqsqfo

 

 

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Thanks for the links especially the sub titles of the American documentary of Norwegian communities which is already helping a lot. The silent film was interesting too showing life as it really was and why there must be many regional dialects still left today though no idea how many, presumably school children are still taught in regional dialects ? Equally as you no doubt already know there are still many regional dialects spoken in the UK today as well despite global media influences.

Incidentally I'm a fan of many prewar UK films when regional accents were still very common, so if you're interested the accents in the prewar film "Rebecca" below the actors speak English in probably what is its most purest form.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZ_PBT-1vGA

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Yes, the plot in "Rebecca" is also a bit of the same, someone (spoiler) burning down the nest of the newly weds. The dialect sounds almost like "queen's English" to me.

The farm schools often teach in "Nynorsk", also called landsmål or "peasant language". Said to be invented by Ivar Aasen, and closer to Old Norse. Earlier, the farmers in the valleys were suspicious to strangers entering their families. 

In Älvdalen in Sweden, they have preserved a special language or dialect. But they are so few, that when the children spent more time in kindergardens and schools, the language is not the same in the new generations. 

Edited by Budeia

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Never really knew what the difference was between Queens's English and the aristos' versions, the latter often  being accused of having a plum in the mouth, a toff being pretentious and so on ! ? The heroine was however very natural and very genuine. What's the difference between Nynorsk and Bokmål ?

Do you know of any you tube etc. documentaries about the history of Norway say between 1600 - 1850 ?

Edited by Celtic Mists
Typo error

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Celtic Mists skrev (23 minutter siden):

What's the difference between Nynorsk and Bokmål ?

Do you know of any you tube etc. documentaries about the history of Norway say between 1600 - 1850 ?

"Vad, Vem" in Swedish, "Hva, Hvem" in Bokmål, "Kva, Kven" in nynorsk. Kva, kven is more like the Icelandic pronounciation. But they write it with HV- in Iceland! To my disappointment, some of the Nynorsk is based on misunderstandings. Another example, the pronouns Eg and Me (I and we) are central in Nynorsk. These do not exist in Icelandic! As they sometimes write the E like É, and then it's said like "Je". So in reality they pronounce Eg like "Jech".

Education, in Norwegian sometimes texted with posters:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eyyeIg1ruR4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=615xiWS6di8

History of Norway, in 9 minutes. In English:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SBRxRYLYLyo

Funny parody, how Danish became a weird language:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FqgRC5sfCaQ

 

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Celtic Mists skrev (19 minutter siden):

Thanks, so it's Bokmål, NyNorsk, Icelandic pius about 90 or so regional dialects so is it easier to talk in English ? ?

For you, maybe.. f.ex. Belgium has the official languages Flemisch Dutch, French and German. 

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I've recently been wondering about how any 2 or 3 year old child starts learning a language and an adult learning the same language as well and if there's a different method between the two. As I said earlier I've been watching Swedish TV now for the past 5 or 6 years and guess I can now understand about 75%, to the point where satisfyingly I rarely switch on the subtitles.

I also now find myself unconciously getting the grammar more and more correct even though it stlll looks strange, so I'm starting to wonder if it's the same sort of joint learning method that all young babies and adults have ?

A bit like an unconscious sponge perhaps....?

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Celtic Mists skrev (2 timer siden):

I also now find myself unconciously getting the grammar more and more correct even though it stlll looks strange, so I'm starting to wonder if it's the same sort of joint learning method that all young babies and adults have ?

Hello! You're right, but Swedish isn't the most difficult language. It hasn't accusative and other cases. A 3-year old is more capable of learning the difficult grammar of German, Russian and Finnish. Some have said that the only way they could speak Russian, was to forget the grammar. But you're doing great.

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jjkoggan skrev (1 time siden):

Finnes det et norsk ord for junkballer?

Eller «pinch»? (Seiling uttrykk) 

Ut fra dette Lynkurset i seiling, virker det som de tre måtene å seile ift vinden er "Slør, Kryss og Lens". Oppfatter det slik at "Kryss" må være ordet for pinch. Men det ser du kanskje selv. 

http://www.galeb.dk/filer/Lynkurs_i_seiling.pdf

Junkballer - Fant en artikkel som snakker om "serve- eller returorientert". Junkballer kan være en som sender litt tøffe baller, en aggressiv eller endog litt stygg spillestil. 

https://www.pinnacle.com/no/betting-articles/Tennis/Which-tennis-players-perform-better-fast-courts/BU72PVRNSVUWKZN9

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Budeia skrev (9 minutter siden):

Ut fra dette Lynkurset i seiling, virker det som de tre måtene å seile ift vinden er "Slør, Kryss og Lens". Oppfatter det slik at "Kryss" må være ordet for pinch. Men det ser du kanskje selv. 

http://www.galeb.dk/filer/Lynkurs_i_seiling.pdf

Junkballer - Fant en artikkel som snakker om "serve- eller returorientert". Junkballer kan være en som sender litt tøffe baller, en aggressiv eller endog litt stygg spillestil. 

https://www.pinnacle.com/no/betting-articles/Tennis/Which-tennis-players-perform-better-fast-courts/BU72PVRNSVUWKZN9

Kryss = point eller beat på engelsk men ikke pinch.

Junkballer er relatert til baseball, noen som ikke er sterk nok til å kjøre hardt og direkte på hva de ønsker men klarer å få det til med å lure folk slik at de ikke helt hva vedkommende skal komme med.  På baseball er det ofte  eldre pitchers som ikke klarer å kaste ballen hurtig lenger men er flink til å lure batters med å kaste ballen slik at den beveger seg på alle slags retninger og er vanskelig å se hvor ballen skal gå.

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