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A bit off topic I know so apologies as I don't know where to post this but can anyone help....?

I was going through some of my father's old RAF papers recently and found a note he had written soon after the war about a Norwegian bomber or fighter Squadron based in Scotland, presumably because it was quite close to Norway.

He got to know quite a few of them because his job was collecting spare parts from crashed bombers and fighters, but didn't mention which Squadron the Norwegian crews were in. However he did say that he and several other RAF friends from 333 Bomber Squadron all spent a lot of time in the nearest pub, but they could never understand a word they said whether they were sober or drunk until they spoke English !

At the bottom of the note long before the internet he said "Must write to the War Office" which he sadly never did, so does anyone know who best to contact in Norway these days ?

Thanks

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No._331_Squadron_RAF

 

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On 4/9/2020 at 4:29 AM, Delvis said:

Hvordan ville man si følgende setning på Engelsk:

 "Det er den boblende kullsyren som oppstår når flasken åpnes, som har gitt drikken betegnelsen Brus på Norsk"

Med Engelsk tenker jeg alltid helst på USA-Engelsk, siden det er den mest brukte varianten.

It is the bubbling CO2 gas that rushes out when the bottle is opened that has given the drink the name “Brus” (fizz) in Norwegian.

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Celtic Mists skrev (6 timer siden):

so does anyone know who best to contact in Norway these days ?

This article mentions some names, Svein Heglund (1918-1998) and Jens Müller. They were some of the founders of the first Norwegian squadron in the UK, 331 Skvadron. Their leader was Hjalmar Riiser Larsen. 

The article is in Norwegian, but can be pasted into Google translate. If it doesn't make sense, you can always ask for help here. As this is the discussion where people ask for help with translations :)

Article: http://www.aeronorge.no/kulturarv/2018/20181213.html

Aero Norway - cultural heritage. If you scroll down there are large photos, one of them of some members of 331. Johannes Greiner, Martin Gran. 2nd row from the left : Helge Sognnæs (d. 1943), Leif Lundsten (d. 1944),
Stein Sem (d. 1942), Knut Backe (d. 1944), Anton C. Hagerup (d. 1943), Rolf Arne Berg (d. 1945),  Philip Yateman, Rolf Engelsen and Svein Heglund. Bottom: Reidar Haave Olsen (d. 1944), Kristian Nyerrød, Fredrik Fearnley (d. 1944) with the dog Varg, Kaj Birksted from Denmark and Tarald Weisteen.

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Great many thanks and very interesting indeed though I cheated a bit as my Swedish wasn't up to it ?

https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=no&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.aeronorge.no%2Fkulturarv%2F2018%2F20181213.html

Do you know if they had any reunions as we did after the war was over on the offchance that they might have kept records  ?

Always glad to help with any translations....

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Celtic Mists skrev (4 timer siden):

Do you know if they had any reunions as we did after the war was over on the offchance that they might have kept records  ?

You're welcome! To find records, perhaps you would have to find family members. Or museums (Aircraftmuseum: "Luftfartsmuseum", Plane museum: "Flymuseum", Reunion: "gjenforening")

The last veteran from World War 1 died in 2012, so not completely impossible that someone is alive. Though this was a much smaller group. 

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Yes thank you again good idea. In the UK we've got a few retirement homes for the armed forces such as in the link below. Are there any similar ones like this one in Norway ?

https://www.britishlegion.org.uk/get-support/care-and-independent-living/our-care-homes

Incidentally are there any Norwegian English forums anywhere I could join as well as it would be great practice....?

Thanks ?

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26 minutes ago, Celtic Mists said:

Yes thank you again good idea. In the UK we've got a few retirement homes for the armed forces such as in the link below. Are there any similar ones like this one in Norway ?

https://www.britishlegion.org.uk/get-support/care-and-independent-living/our-care-homes

Incidentally are there any Norwegian English forums anywhere I could join as well as it would be great practice....?

Thanks ?

I have used  these fora for several years to practice my Norwegian.  Virtually all speak fluent English here and don't mind if you mix languages when you get stuck.  This one in particular has been used for non-native speakers to  practice and get advice on speaking proper Norwegian.

 

Norwegians generally are pleased when you show interest in their language and culture and love to help, at least that is my experience as an american.

 

Lykke til!

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6 minutes ago, Budeia said:

At least I found one here: (defence's veteran center)  https://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forsvarets_veteransenter

Not sure about other disussion forums, maybe you could look at youtube and ask someone there.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbrUYR892qBNQyY3DEqfTBg

Thank you the Defence's Veteran's Centre residents sounds a great place to start as I think they would have a lot of memories and had the time since then to have done quite a lot of research into it all....

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14 minutes ago, jjkoggan said:

I have used  these fora for several years to practice my Norwegian.  Virtually all speak fluent English here and don't mind if you mix languages when you get stuck.  This one in particular has been used for non-native speakers to  practice and get advice on speaking proper Norwegian.

Norwegians generally are pleased when you show interest in their language and culture and love to help, at least that is my experience as an american.

Great thank you very helpful indeed. I can get by ok with a fair amount of Norwegian text as there are quite a lot of recognizable similar words in Swedish too, equally spoken Norwegian as well if it's Bokmål which from what I've heard most Swedes can also follow.

I think the obvious first question is do Swedes set out to write and speak in Norwegian and vice versa, assuming that the Norwegians can in similar fashion understand Swedish anyway ?

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Celtic Mists skrev (17 minutter siden):

write and speak in Norwegian and vice versa,

You'll get far by speaking Swedish in Norway and vice versa, but certain words are challenging and will have to be changed. The actor Thomas von Brömssen has played in both Swedish and Norwegian tv-series.  "Rolig" means calm in Norwegian, but "funny" in Swedish and can cause misunderstandings. And there are other words too. 

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16 minutes ago, Celtic Mists said:

Great thank you very helpful indeed. I can get by ok with a fair amount of Norwegian text as there are quite a lot of recognizable similar words in Swedish too, equally spoken Norwegian as well if it's Bokmål which from what I've heard most Swedes can also follow.

I think the obvious first question is do Swedes set out to write and speak in Norwegian and vice versa, assuming that the Norwegians can in similar fashion understand Swedish anyway ?

Swedes I have spoken to say that they understand most of what Norwegians say and also vice versa.  When I studied biology in Norway the textbook was in swedish, not norwegian and the students were expected to understand it more or less.  This was more challenging for me, of course.

I too,  have been searching ancestral information.  My grandfather, who was born in England and immigrated to Indiana as a boy, fought in the trenches in WWI in a canadian uniform.  Luckily there are no language barriers to my searches.

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6 minutes ago, Budeia said:

You'll get far by speaking Swedish in Norway and vice versa, but certain words are challenging and will have to be changed. The actor Thomas von Brömssen has played in both Swedish and Norwegian tv-series.  "Rolig" means calm in Norwegian, but "funny" in Swedish and can cause misunderstandings. And there are other words too. 

Never knew that speaking Swedish in Norway one would be understood so very useful thank you ! However what about writing and reading in Swedish is that much the same or ? Equally vice versa....?

Btw I can still barely understand a word of Danish if it weren't for the subtitles !

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25 minutes ago, jjkoggan said:

Swedes I have spoken to say that they understand most of what Norwegians say and also vice versa.  When I studied biology in Norway the textbook was in swedish, not norwegian and the students were expected to understand it more or less.  This was more challenging for me, of course.

I too,  have been searching ancestral information.  My grandfather, who was born in England and immigrated to Indiana as a boy, fought in the trenches in WWI in a canadian uniform.  Luckily there are no language barriers to my searches.

Interesting about your grandfather. If you haven't already have you tried any Google regiment searches about your grandfather from your info above ?

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5 minutes ago, Celtic Mists said:

Never knew that speaking Swedish in Norway one would be understood so very useful thank you ! However what about writing and reading in Swedish is that much the same or ? Equally vice versa....?

Btw I can still barely understand a word of Danish if it weren't for the subtitles !

Norwegian, Swedish and Danish are asymmetrically mutually intelligible. It's relatively unique and also confusing. The respective native speakers understand each other to a different degree. To add to the confusion this also depends on spoken vs written language. 

I'd provide the full matrix if was clear to me, but generally Norwegians understand spoken Swedish and written Danish, Danes don't understand Swedish, while the Swedes don't typically understand Norwegian nor Danish. 

I've inquired with a relative concerning one of the less common names in the 334 sqn., will let you know if I hear of anything.

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1 hour ago, process said:

Norwegian, Swedish and Danish are asymmetrically mutually intelligible. It's relatively unique and also confusing. The respective native speakers understand each other to a different degree. To add to the confusion this also depends on spoken vs written language. 

I'd provide the full matrix if was clear to me, but generally Norwegians understand spoken Swedish and written Danish, Danes don't understand Swedish, while the Swedes don't typically understand Norwegian nor Danish. 

I've inquired with a relative concerning one of the less common names in the 334 sqn., will let you know if I hear of anything.

Tack för din hjälp med att söka efter någon släkting.

Jag kan förstar omkring 70% - 75% av talad och skriven Svensk, båkmal Norsk kanske 50%, och förstår Norsk ungefär 30% med en liten skriftlig norsk. Äntligen ingen alls Danske kunskap.

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5 minutes ago, Celtic Mists said:

Tack för din hjälp med att söka efter någon släkting.

Jag kan förstar omkring 70% - 75% av talad och skriven Svensk, båkmal Norsk kanske 50%, och förstår Norsk ungefär 30% med en liten skriftlig norsk. Äntligen ingen alls Danske kunskap.

What is your goal here? Are you afte any information or are you looking to get in touch with survivors from the sqn?

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Hej igen

Jag har titta på två Norsk filmer med två olika accenter, den forsta jag förstott bra men dem sekund var väldigt svårt. Jag tro de forst är Bokmål men den sekund jag har ingen aning om, kanske en av de många accenter genom hela Norge....?

Tack ?

https://tv.nrk.no/serie/roed-snoe/sesong/1/episode/1/avspiller

https://tv.nrk.no/serie/vestavind/sesong/1/episode/1/avspiller

Edited by Celtic Mists
Felaktig ordning på filmer....

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Celtic Mists skrev (35 minutter siden):

men den sekund jag har ingen aning om

Nummer två er från Vest (west). The village is fictious, but the dialect seems to be Voss and/or Sauda. They say "da" for "that", which is closer to English than "det". And close to Icelandic "dat". The first link is "bokmål" (Red Snow). 

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